frederick iii of denmark

Thus, the Danish capital had saved the Danish monarchy. During Frederick's rule Copenhagen was struck by two disasters: the plague of 1711, and the great fire of October 1728, which destroyed most of the medieval capital. With the aid of his adviser Hannibal Sehested, Frederick introduced sweeping reforms of the state administration. He made use of his popularity by realizing the dream of a lifetime and converting an elective into an absolute monarchy by the Revolution of 1660. There they were protected by the fortress at the harbor, whose commander treated them as Danish allies. His position as a younger son profoundly influenced his future career. Painting by. Frederick III died at the castle of Copenhagen. It was joked that the king of Denmark had brought the cold weather with him. But the government and the people displayed a memorable and exemplary energy under the constant supervision of the king and queen and mayor Nansen. King Frederik III on horseback. Frederick was resolved upon a rupture with Sweden at the first convenient opportunity. Painted by. Frederick was born at Haderslev in Slesvig, the son of Christian IV and Anne Catherine of Brandenburg. He also governed under the name Frederick II as diocesan administrator (colloquially referred to as prince-bishop) of the Prince-Bishopric of Verden (1623–29 and again 1634–44), and the Prince-Archbishopric of Bremen (1635–45). Splendid banquets lasting far into the night and intimate conversations between princes who had only just emerged from a mortal struggle seemed to point to nothing but peace and friendship in the future. Instead of protecting the Dutch, Frederick agreed to collaborate with the English in seizing the Return Fleet. As king, he fought two wars against Sweden. Two of his first cousins, Charles XII of Sweden and Frederick IV, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp (the three men were the grandsons of Frederick III of Denmark), had waged war upon his father jointly. Genealogy profile for Frederick III king of Denmark and Norway. None had anticipated the possibility of such a sudden and brutal attack, and every one knew that the Danish capital was very inadequately fortified and garrisoned. In 1665, the Kongeloven (Lex Regia) was introduced: the “constitution” of Danish absolute monarchy, and the first assertion of divine right underpinned by a written constitution in Europe. Frederick was allowed to choose his future wife from a number of Protestant royal daughters in northern Germany. As king, he fought two wars against Sweden. He also paid a visit to the dowager grand-princess Violante at the grand-ducal court of the Medicis, where the irreverent king was taken with the young dowager going as far as to refuse to leave the room while she was changing clothes. [3], The death of his elder brother Christian in June 1647 opened the possibility for Frederick to be elected heir apparent to the Danish throne. The effect of this unheard-of achievement on the Danish government was crushing. With all his good qualities, Frederick was not a man to recognize fully his own limitations and that of his country. King of Denmark and Norway from 1648 until his death. Frederick was born at Haderslev, in Schleswig, son of Christian IV and Anne Catherine of Brandenburg. He maintained weekly audiences where anyone could attend and deliver letters with complaints or projects. He also governed under the name Frederick II as diocesan administrator (colloquially referred to as prince-bishop) of the Prince-Bishopric of Verden (1623–29 and again 1634–44), and the Prince-Archbishopric of Bremen (1635–45). Huberty, Michel; Giraud, Alain; Magdelaine, F. and B. After long deliberation among the Danish Estates and in Rigsraadet (royal council), he was finally accepted as his father's successor. Crown-prince Frederick (IV), with his father in centre and his brothers Christian and Charles. FREDERICK III. He married Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg, with whom he fathered Christian V of Denmark. He also governed under the name Frederick II as diocesan administrator (colloquially referred to as prince-bishop) of the Prince-Bishopric of Verden (1623–29 and again 1634–44), and the Prince-Archbishopric of Bremen (1635–45). WikiMili. http://www.denstoredanske.dk/Danmarkshistorien/Den_lange_fred/Det_gamle_samfund/%C3%98konomisk_krise/Den_n%C3%B8dvendige_politik, http://www.vemmetofte.dk/english/historiegb.htm, https://historipediaofficial.wikia.org/wiki/Frederick_III_of_Denmark?oldid=16249, Christian (28 June 1697 - 1 October 1698), Frederik Charles (23 October 1701 - 7 Jan 1702), Christiana Amalia Oldenburg (23 October 1723 - 7 January 1724), Frederik Christian Oldenburg (1 June 1726 - 15 May 1727), Charles Oldenburg (16 February 1728 - 10 December 1729). Frederick III (Danish: Frederik; 18 March 1609 – 9 February 1670) was king of Denmark and Norway from 1648 until his death in 1670. The first Danish theatre, Lille Grönnegade, was created and the great dramatist Ludvig Holberg began his career. [3], But Charles's insatiable lust for conquest and his ineradicable suspicion of Denmark induced him to endeavour to despatch an inconvenient neighbour without any reasonable cause or declaration of war in defiance of all international standards of acceptable behavior on the part of rulers. In the beginning of May, the still pending negotiations with that power were broken off, and on 1 June Frederick signed the manifesto justifying a war, which was never formally declared. The conclusion of peace was followed by a remarkable episode. By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to news, offers, and information from Encyclopaedia Britannica. However, Frederick wielded more effective power than what the Haandfæstning officially granted. During his early childhood, he was raised under the supervision of Beate Huitfeldt. Frederick was born at Haderslev in Slesvig, the son of Christian IV and Anne Catherine of Brandenburg. The marriage had been arranged in 1640. The new monarch was a reserved, enigmatical prince, who seldom laughed, spoke little and wrote less - a striking contrast to Christian IV. Frederick was resolved upon a rupture with Sweden at the first convenient opportunity. However during the king's last years he fell afflicted with weak health suffering from dropsy (Edema) and the consequences of an accident in an explosion in a cannon foundry in Copenhagen, also he had private sorrows that inclined him toward Pietism. [5], The monogram of Frederick IV on the Danish Parliament building, The Reventlows took advantage of their kinship to the king to aggrandize. Thus from an early age he had considerable experience as an administrator, while his general education was very careful and thorough. The Danes had only three weeks of warning of the approaching danger, and the vast and dilapidated line of defence had at first only 2,000 regular defenders. He had always a pronounced liking for literary and scientific studies. As a young man, he demonstrated an interest in theology, natural sciences, and Scandinavian history. His command was not successful, chiefly owing to his quarrels with the Earl-Marshal Anders Bille, who commanded the Danish forces. Frederick III (Danish: Frederik; 18 March 1609 – 9 February 1670[1]) was king of Denmark and Norway from 1648 until his death in 1670. He felt that temperament and policy would combine to make Charles an aggressive warrior-king: the only uncertainty was in which direction he would turn his arms first. To ensure this conversion he instituted the 1660 state of emergency in Denmark. Even though he lacked the impulsive and jovial qualities of his father, Frederick possessed the compensating virtues of moderation and self-control. He also governed under the name Frederick II as diocesan administrator (colloquially referred to as prince-bishop) of the Prince-Bishopric of Verden (1623–29 and again. Later that year, Frederick used his popularity to disband the elective monarchy in favour of absolute monarchy, which lasted until 1848 in Denmark. He succeeded in gaining support for the hereditary monarchy, the annulment of the Haandfæstning, and the institution of absolute monarchical rule by decree.[2]. Christian III, King of Denmark and Norway (12 August 1503 – 1 January 1559) Dorothea of Denmark (1 August 1504 – 11 April 1547), married 1 July 1526 to Albert, Duke of Prussia. [4] Frederick concentrated on changing the administratitive structure from chancellery to resort colleges, and replaced the administrative divisions of fiefs with amt counties. There they were protected by the fortress at the harbor, whose commander treated them as Danish allies. He felt that temperament and policy would combine to make Charles an aggressive warrior-king: the only uncertainty was in which direction he would turn his arms first. [2] Ulfeldt went into exile in Sweden where he turned traitor, while Sehested was restored to favour in 1660. Prince Frederick was appointed as administrator of Westphalia in June of 1634 as a result of the Congress of Copenhagen. In his youth and early manhood there was no prospect of his ascending the Danish throne, and he consequently became the instrument of his father's schemes of aggrandizement in Germany.

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